mla citation

Below are quotations and paraphrases from a student paper that uses MLA-style documentation. After each citation are possible entries for the list of works cited. Highlight the entry that uses MLA style correctly. Example The student is quoting from page 45 of a book called The Devil’s Flu by Pete Davies, published in New York in 2000 by Henry Holt and Company. In-Text Citation: Davies points out that during the 1918 influenza pandemic, “The United States is reckoned to have lost somewhere from half a million to 650,000 peopleâmore souls than that nation has lost in every war it’s fought this century put together” (45). Works Cited:a. Davies, Pete. The Devil’s Flu. New York: Henry Holt, 2000. Print. b. Davies, Pete, The Devil’s Flu, Henry Holt: New York, 2000. Print

1. The student is quoting from page 608 of The Global Past by Lanny B. Fields, Russell J. Barber, and Cheryl A. Riggs, a book published in Boston by Bedford Books in 1998. In-Text Citation: As Fields, Barber, and Riggs note, “Although there are very few known cases of intentional infection of American Indians with diseases, rampant epidemics were an important ally in the European conquest of the Americas” (608).

Works Cited:

a. Fields, Lanny B., Russell J. Barber, and Cheryl A. Riggs. The Global Past. Boston: Bedford, 1998. Print.

b. Fields, Lanny B., Barber, Russell J., and Riggs, Cheryl A. The Global Past. Boston: Bedford, 1998. Print.

2. The student is quoting from page 11 of the fourth edition of The American Promise by James L. Roark, Michael P. Johnson, Patricia Cline Cohen, Sarah Stage, and Susan M. Hartmann, a book published in Boston by Bedford/St. Martin’s in 2009. In-Text Citation: The arrival of Europeans in the New World brought “Old World microorganisms that caused epidemics of smallpox, measles, and other diseases that killed the vast majority of Indian peoples during the sixteenth century and continued to decimate survivors in later centuries” (Roark, Johnson, Cohen, Stage, and Hartmann 11). Works Cited:

a. Roark, James L., et al. The American Promise. 4th ed. Boston: Bedford, 2009. Print.

b. Roark, James L., Michael P. Johnson, Patricia Cline Cohen, Sarah Stage, and Susan M. Hartmann. The American Promise. 4th ed. Boston: Bedford, 2009.

3. The student is quoting from page 2 of the introduction to Plagues and Peoples by William H. McNeill, a book published in 1976 by Anchor Press, which is an imprint of Doubleday, based in Garden City, New York. The introduction is also by McNeill.

In-Text Citation: To explain why the Central American peoples abandoned their old religions after suffering through the smallpox epidemic imported by Europeans, McNeill emphasizes the “psychological implications of a disease that killed only Indians and left Spaniards unharmed” (2).

Works Cited:

a. McNeill, William H. Introduction. Plagues and Peoples. By McNeill. New York: Anchor-Doubleday, 1976. Print.

b. McNeill, William H. Plagues and Peoples. New York: Doubleday, 1976. Print.

4. The student is quoting lines 5 and 6 of a poem, “Saturday: The Small-Pox,” by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. The poem is found in a book called Eighteenth-Century Women Poets, edited by Roger Lonsdale and published in Oxford by Oxford University Press in 1989. In-Text Citation: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, whose famously beautiful face was ravaged by smallpox, lamented the changes brought by the disease: “How I am changed! alas! how I am grown / A frightful spectre, to myself unknown!” (lines 5-6).

Works Cited:

a. Montagu, Lady Mary Wortley. “Saturday: The Small-Pox.” Eighteenth-Century Women Poets. Ed. Roger Lonsdale. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1989. 56-58. Print.

b. Lonsdale, Roger, ed. “Saturday: The Small-Pox.” By Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989. 56-58. Print.

5. The student is quoting from page A22 of a newspaper article, “Scientists Favoring Cautious Approach to Smallpox Shots,” by Denise Grady. The article begins on page A1 of the late edition of the New York Times from December 20, 2002. In-Text Citation: A survey conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health found most Americans worried more about smallpox vaccinations than about the disease. However, as Grady reports, “there is no treatment for smallpox, and in past outbreaks the disease has killed about 30 percent of those infected, while leaving many survivors blind or scarred” (A22). Works Cited:

a. Grady, Denise. “Scientists Favoring Cautious Approach to Smallpox Shots.” New York Times Dec. 20, 2002: A1, A22. Print.

b. Grady, Denise. “Scientists Favoring Cautious Approach to Smallpox Shots.” New York Times 20 Dec. 2002, late ed.: A1+. Print.

6. The student is quoting from a letter to the editor of the New York Times written by David S. Perlin and published on page A38 of the late edition on December 26, 2002. In-Text Citation: David S. Perlin, the scientific director of the Public Health Research Institute, argues that “mass smallpox vaccination is problematic and barely holds up to risk-benefit analysis” (A38). Works Cited:

a. Perlin, David. “Letter.” New York Times 26 December 2002, late edition: A38. Print.

b. Perlin, David S. Letter. New York Times 26 Dec. 2002, late ed.: A38. Print.

7. The student is quoting from an online version of a newspaper article, “Health Officials Fear Local Impact of Smallpox Plan,” by Lawrence K. Altman and Anahad O’Connor. The article appeared on the New York Times Web site, sponsored by the New York Times, on January 5, 2003, and was accessed January 7, 2003. The article is found at http:// In-Text Citation: While public health officials want to be prepared for all emergencies, money is a problem, as Lawrence K. Altman and Anahad O’Connor note: “In recent years, many expert panels have warned that budget cuts were causing the nation’s public health system to crumble. On top of traditional services for mothers and children, health departments have had to apply more sophisticated laboratory techniques and newer methods to counter the resurgence of tuberculosis and to keep other infectious diseases in check.”

Works Cited:

a. Altman, Lawrence K., and Anahad O’Connor. “Health Officials Fear Local Impact of Smallpox Plan.” New York Times. New York Times, 5 Jan. 2003. Web. 7 Jan. 2003.

b. Altman, Lawrence K., and Anahad O’Connor. “Health Officials Fear Local Impact of Smallpox Plan.” New York Times 5 Jan. 2003 http:// The student is quoting from an article, “The Public and the Smallpox Threat,” by Robert J. Blendon, Catherine M. DesRoches, John M. Benson, Melissa J. Herrmann, Kalahn Taylor-Clark, and Kathleen J. Weldon in the online version of the January 30, 2002 issue (volume 348, number 5) of the scholarly journal, the New England Journal of Medicine. The article was published online at http://nejm.org/earlyrelease/early.asp on December 19, 2002, and accessed January 8, 2003. In-Text Citation: The New England Journal of Medicine has noted the importance of physicians in public perceptions of smallpox vaccination, saying, “If the threat of a smallpox attack increases, Americans’ individual decisions about vaccination will be strongly influenced by what practicing physicians choose to do. If physicians are reluctant to be vaccinated, large numbers of Americans will be unwilling to do it voluntarily” (Blendon, DesRoches, Benson, Herrmann, Taylor-Clark, and Weldon).

Works Cited:

a. Blendon, Robert J., Catherine M. DesRoches, John M. Benson, Melissa J. Herrmann, Kalahn Taylor-Clark, and Kathleen J. Weldon. “The Public and the Smallpox Threat.” New England Journal of Medicine 30 Jan. 2003. 8 Jan. 2003.

b. Blendon, Robert J., Catherine M. DesRoches, John M. Benson, Melissa J. Herrmann, Kalahn Taylor-Clark, and Kathleen J. Weldon. “The Public and the Smallpox Threat.” New England Journal of Medicine 348.5 (2003): n. pag. Web. 8 Jan. 2003.

9. The student is citing a document, Protecting Americans: Smallpox Vaccination Program, from a U.S. government agency, the Centers for Disease Control. The document is found on the CDC Web site at http:// vaccination/vaccination-program-statement.asp, posted December 13, 2002, and accessed January 7, 2003. No author is listed for the document. In-Text Citation: The Centers for Disease Control Web site announces, “Although there is no reason to believe that smallpox presents an imminent threat, the attacks of September and October 2001, have heightened concern that terrorists may have access to the virus and attempt to use it against the American public” (United States).

Works Cited:

a. U. S. Centers for Disease Control. Protecting Americans: Smallpox Vaccination Program. CDC, 13 Dec. 2002. 7 Jan. 2003 http:// vaccination/vaccination-program-statement.asp.

b. United States. Centers for Disease Control. Protecting Americans: Smallpox Vaccination Program. CDC, 13 Dec. 2002. Web. 7 Jan. 2003.

10. The student is quoting from a review of two books, The Demon in the Freezer: A True Story, by Richard Preston, and Federal Bodysnatchers and the New Guinea Virus: People, Parasites, Politics, by Robert S. Desowitz. The review, “Bugs without Borders,” by Helen Epstein, appeared on pages 20-23 of the New York Review of Books on January 16, 2003. In-Text Citation: Helen Epstein argues that “activities underway in America’s biodefense labs come . . . [close] to, if they do not exceed, the limits set by the 1972 Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention” (20).

Works Cited:

a. Epstein, Helen. “Bugs without Borders.” Rev. of The Demon in the Freezer: A True Story, by Richard Preston, and Federal Bodysnatchers and the New Guinea Virus: People, Parasites, Politics, by Robert S. Desowitz. New York Review of Books 16 Jan. 2003: 20-23. Print.

b. Epstein, Helen. “Bugs without

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